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All about

THE BLACK TRUMPET

The black trumpet (Craterellus cornucopioides) is also known as the trumpet of death or the horn of plenty. It is a common fungus found in forests as soon as the soil is sufficiently humid.

It is a delicious edible mushroom which is incredibly fragrant and tasty and can be used in a variety of culinary preparations.

THE BLACK TRUMPET, AN ELEGANT MUSHROOM THAT LENDS ITSELF TO VARIOUS PREPARATIONS

Its flesh is black, thin and membranous. The black trumpet has a flared cap in the shape of a hollow funnel which extends to the base of the foot. The resulting tube therefore stands on its own and can measure up to 10 to 15 cm in height.

HISTORY

The black trumpet's more intriguing name of "the trumpet of death" can be explained by its period of growth. The black trumpet grows quite late in the autumn, around All Saints' Day – the feast of the dead.

The name horn of plenty, used in some regions, is much more complimentary and comes from the shape of the fungus. Black trumpet, the trumpet of death or the trumpet of the Maures? When Alexander Borde, founder of our company, decided to start selling this mushroom, he felt that its common French name, "trompette de la mort" or "trumpet of death" was not a particularly appetising name. Having family ties in the Nice area, he often travelled to the Massif des Maures mountain range to pick mushrooms.

At that time, many black trumpets could be picked in these mountains. And so, Alexandre very quickly made the decision to rename the so-called "trumpet of death", labelling it the "trumpet of the Maures"! A true king of marketing ahead of his time!

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Where does the black trumpet grow?

The black trumpet appears in large groups under deciduous trees and damp slopes, often in the accumulated litter layer that houses its mycelium. However, the black trumpet does not grow every year. Over a decade, we will see two to three annual harvests. This is a fungus that prefers deciduous forests and mainly finds its preferred habitat under beech trees.

It is rarely found in coniferous woods.

HARVEST SEASON:

This fungus grows late in the autumn. Very humid (rainy) periods must occur for black trumpets to grow in the undergrowth. This growth generally offers up several trumpets, which are particularly fond of litter layers consisting of dead leaves.

FLAVOUR AND AROMA COMBINATIONS:

Its other name, the horn of plenty, perfectly reflects the abundant and delicious character of this fungus.

It has a fine texture, developing fruity aromas and a delicious "umami" flavour.

The black trumpet offers up an interesting balance between a sweet taste, linked to a particularly high glucose content in comparison to other fungi. This fungus also has a pronounced "umami" flavour, as a result of its high levels of amino acids and nucleotides responsible for this flavour. Like the other species of the Cantharellacaeae group (chanterelles, yellow foot, etc.), it develops very characteristic fruity aromas, with clear notes of citrus (lemon, orange, mandarin), as well as apricot, plum and pear.

More spicy and sweet notes like honey can also be found, as well as notes that reflect its wild character: aromatic notes of pine undergrowth or holm oak.

NUTRITIONAL BENEFITS:

The black trumpet has a very good satiety index. This comes from its dietary fibre content, as well as flavours and aromas that satisfy the appetite and certain molecules with an appetite-suppressant effect. Like all mushrooms, the black trumpet has a very low calorie and sugar content.

It is a good source of highly assimilable proteins, quickly used by the body after a meal. It is also a fungus rich in microelements (iron and zinc). Recent scientific studies have identified bioactive compounds known to provide preventative power against certain diseases.

MAISON BORDE OFFERS
A WIDE RANGE
OF BLACK TRUMPETS

TROMPETTES DE LA MORT - BORDE - EN CONSERVE

DEHYDRATED BLACK TRUMPETS

Dried black trumpets are perfect for adding to meat pies or other terrines. Fabrice Desvignes, chef to the French president, recommends incorporating it within your recipes in their dry state.

This way, the trumpet will rehydrate in contact with other ingredients making up the filling, revealing its full aroma in meat pies. The chef adds a very important detail: by integrating the mushroom in its dry state, your meat pies and terrines will last longer.

In powder or granulated, the black trumpet will enhance all your sauces. An omelette with black trumpets, accompanied by a green salad, makes for a simple but very tasty dish.

CANNED BLACK TRUMPETS

Whether dehydrated or canned, the black trumpet makes for a truly delicious ingredient in a tagliatelle dish. It should be noted that the canned trumpet will have a less fibrous appearance than a dehydrated trumpet, developing less pronounced aromas as sterilisation somewhat attenuates the flavours of food.

A jar of canned black trumpets is a great way to diversify colours in a vegetable stir-fry.

cèpes déshydrates

Mmmmm!

HOW DO YOU COOK THE BLACK TRUMPET?

The black trumpet offers up a wide variety of culinary options, thanks to its varied and very marked characteristics: sweet and delicious umami tastes, very pronounced fruity aromas and spicier notes.

In cream-based preparations: creamy poultry recipes enhance the umami synergy between white meat (poultry) and the black trumpet, as cream enhances this flavour and the aromatic richness of the mushroom.

In fruity and sweet recipes : the black trumpet develops its full aromatic richness alongside a duck breast or with Peking duck with trumpets and pears.

In citrus recipes: a lemon chicken with black trumpets or a pumpkin soup with orange and black trumpet.

In cold recipes: in black-trumpet salads or tapenades, after they have been fully steamed and cooled.

OUR FAVOURITE BLACK TRUMPET RECIPES

Chicken and mushroom pie

Chicken and mushroom pie

Preserved black trumpets

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